Psychology

Decriminalization is just the start of real reform – and… users need to be part of the conversation

For… users, the potential pitfalls of [blanket] decriminalization are frightening and all too likely to happen. One fear they have about decriminalization is that authorities will drop criminal punishments, only to raise an oppressive regime of civil penalties – specifically, issuing tickets and fines… a fear is that… decriminalize [all] drugs, that’s where the experiment…

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Anthropology

…drug decriminalization and “treatment” measure qualifies for… ballot

There were 8,903 drug simple drug possession arrests in the state in fiscal year 2018, according to the Oregon Criminal Justice Commission—or more than one every hour. The initiative has also been endorsed by more than 50 other organizations, including ACLU Oregon, United Seniors of Oregon, Oregon Latino Health Coalition, Oregon State Council For Retired Citizens, the NAACP…

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Advocates denounce White House opioid commission’s emphasis on drug courts and proposed increase in drug sentences

Most drug courts do not reduce imprisonment, do not save money or improve public safety, and ultimately fail to help people struggling with drug problems. Today’s drug courts are no more effective — but are considerably more costly — than voluntary treatment, with participants often spending more time behind bars than those whose cases are…

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President Trump’s opioid panel will recommend nationwide drug courts, tightened requirements for prescribers

The commission will recommend the Department of Justice establish [more] drug courts in every federal district, and that individuals with substance use disorder who violate probation terms be diverted to a drug court… President Trump’s commission on combating the opioid epidemic plans to encourage the federal government to establish drug courts in every federal judicial…

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Do drug courts reduce the use of incarceration? A meta-analysis.

Drug courts did not significantly reduce the average amount of time offenders spent behind bars, suggesting that any benefits realized from a lower incarceration rate are offset by the long sentences imposed on participants when they fail the program. Drug courts eliminate the experience of incarceration for many drug-involved offenders, but they also do not…

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Neither justice nor treatment ; drug courts in the United States

[This report] is based on interviews with health care professionals, social workers, judges, lawyers, drug court staff, and drug court participants. “Drug courts regularly set participants up for failure. Few communities have adequate treatment facilities, insurance plans often won’t finance effective treatment programs, and the criminal justice objectives of drug courts often overrule the medical…

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An overdose death is not murder: why drug-induced homicide laws are counterproductive and inhumane

There is no evidence that enforcement of drug-induced homicide reduces drug use or sales, or deadly overdoses. Rather, the only behavior that is actually deterred is the seeking of life-saving medical assistance for fear of prosecution. This is especially true because police and prosecutors are widely abusing their discretion in investigating and prosecuting drug-induced homicide…

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Expanding drug courts won’t help ease the opioid crisis

Most drug courts do not reduce imprisonment, do not save money or improve public safety, and ultimately fail to help people struggling with drug problems. Today’s drug courts are no more effective — but are considerably more costly — than voluntary treatment, and often leave their participants worse off for trying. Most U.S. drug courts…

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