Medicine/Healing

Behind… Denver’s journey into… (mushroom) thinking

To be clear, shrooms will not be fully legal here. They will be treated the way marijuana was in Denver after decriminalization in 2005: city cops’ and the district attorney’s “lowest law enforcement priority.” The new ordnance specifies that no city funds are to be used to jail, arrest or even ticket someone for possession…

READ MORE
Anthropology

Things to know as psychedelic access approaches a tipping point

[In some parts of the world], psilocybin is not only decriminalized but fully legal, taxed by the government, and sold in dozens of retail stores across the country. Both [cannabis and psilocybin] have found a path to acceptance through the efforts of medicalization, as mainstream society has shown support for natural substances with demonstrable healing…

READ MORE
Medicine/Healing

The first vote to decriminalize psychedelic mushrooms is happening…

“Why are we putting individuals in prison and taking away their children for using something that is physically safe, non-addictive, and has such tremendous medical benefit?” the arguments-in-favor section reads. “Psilocybin mushrooms are safer than cannabis and alcohol. Not only are they non-addictive, but they also treat depression, addiction, and end-of-life anxiety.” Shall the voters…

READ MORE
Medicine/Healing

Sure, cannabis is a “gateway drug”, leading toward less use of other drugs

A number of studies, including two published just last month, have also found that cannabis can impact a person’s use of benzodiazepines. One found that 45 percent of participants ceased their benzo use by the end of the study period; the other saw 22 percent of participants substituting weed for benzos. As more and more prohibitionist cannabis policies are reversed…

READ MORE
Medicine/Healing

[Is it]…too Late For Cannabis, [and] What About the Future of the Psychedelic Industry?

When we try to medicalize therapeutic drug experiences, a doctor’s note can become the difference between a “good” drug user and a “bad” drug user. But, in our broken medical system, medicalizing drug policy is a moral compromise. It redirects the movement, tilting compassion and liberty toward pathology, perpetuating the racist and stigmatizing overtones embedded…

READ MORE
Medicine/Healing

Here’s why we must continue to study Kratom and other opioid-like drugs

The FDA recommendation to the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) to schedule (as in, effectively ban) Kratom and its alkaloids threatens fledgling efforts by researchers to investigate the alkaloids as potential new pain treatments, would hinder scientific advances as well as crucial preclinical and clinical studies. In February 2018, the FDA commissioner released a statement declaring…

READ MORE