Science

Drug researchers find brain effects of MDMA have been misread all along

The paper, published May 7, 2018 in the Journal of Psychopharmacology, shows evidence that harmful long-term effects of MDMA are probably caused by very high doses that most people don’t actually take. -Study’s authors were led by Balázs Szigeti, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Edinburgh,

In the Global Drug Survey, which includes recreational ecstasy use data from 11,168 people, ecstasy users reported they took a usual amount of 1.5 pills per session about 0.67 times per month, which means they took an average of 12.2 pills per year — a number the researchers call Dose Intensity. But when they looked at the usage rates for people in the neuroimaging studies, they found these individuals reported an average of 2.7 pills per session, taken about 2.6 times per month, for a grand total of 87.3 pills per year. This means that the people whose serotonin levels and function were being measured in the lab were actually taking much, much more MDMA than the typical user.

Original Article (Inverse):
Drug researchers find brain effects of MDMA have been misread all along
Artwork Fair Use: Globaltraveller

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