Politics

DEA still insists marijuana has no ‘accepted medical use’

[The United States 91st Congress’ (which met in Washington, DC from January 3, 1969, to January 3, 1971, during the final weeks of the presidency of Lyndon Johnson and the first two years of the first presidency of Richard Nixon) enacted]… Controlled Substances Act [CSA] gives the Drug Enforcement Agency [DEA] the authority to reschedule drugs in consultation with the Department of Health and Human Services [HHS]. The National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws [NORML] filed the first petition asking the DEA to reclassify cannabis half a century ago.

But neither that case nor subsequent challenges made much headway, because federal courts have deferred to the agency’s interpretation of the CSA’s scheduling criteria. According to the DEA, marijuana has “no currently accepted medical use” because it does not satisfy a five-part test that the agency invented, which demands the sort of evidence that would be required to win approval of a new medicine by the Food and Drug Administration. In the DEA’s view, the fact that most states allow patients to use marijuana for symptom relief is irrelevant.

Original Article (Reason):
DEA still insists marijuana has no ‘accepted medical use’
Artwork Fair Use: Myotus

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