Politics

International law allows for the legalization of cannabis

The regulated cultivation and trade of cannabis for recreational use is permissible on the basis of states’ positive human rights obligations.

This is the result of research by Legal scholars Piet Hein van Kempen and Masha Fedorova of Radboud University in Nijmegen, the Netherlands. In their research Van Kempen and Fedorova concluded that the U.N. Drugs Conventions as such do not allow for the regulated legislation of the cultivation and trade of cannabis for recreational use. Thus, their new study offers new insights from a human rights perspective. Five conditions The five primary conditions for regulated legalization are: This must be in the interest of the protection of human rights…. The state must demonstrate that the regulated legalization of the cultivation and trade of cannabis will result in the more effective protection of human rights…. The decision regarding such regulation must have public support and must be decided through the nationwide democratic process…. There must be a closed system so that foreign countries are not disadvantaged in any way by this measure. … The state is required to actively discourage cannabis use. If a state can meet these conditions, under current international law it is permissible to give priority to human rights obligations over the obligations of the U.N. drug conventions.

From the Article (Science Daily):
International law allows for the legalization of cannabis
Artwork Fair Use: Thor NL

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