Anthropology

Iboga the future of a plant with psychotropic effects

In Gabon it takes at least ten years to be a master initiator and to see Westerners as master initiators in two months is shocking” write Yann Guignon, founder of the NGO “Blessing of the Forest”. In Gabon it is inseparable from the rites of passage (“bwiti”) but about 50 years ago its use was extended.

Iboga has become an attractive plant for foreigners over the years and Gabon, like the ayahuasca of the Amazon, welcomes many Westerners interested in it … The illegal sale of the iboga is often done through the “dark web” (a part of the internet without rules over which the authorities have little control). Yann Guignon affirms that there are “iboga specialists” more or less serious outside of Gabon, where “they started”. “On their return to their countries, they appropriate some traditional codes and open the business. In Gabon it takes at least ten years to be a master initiator and to see Westerners as master initiators in two months is shocking, “he protests … Yann Guignon toured the country and is based on indicators such as scarcity and degradation of the quality of the plant in the markets, or “the increase of 100% of prices in 25 years.” The iboga, he says, is fragile. It is a plant that likes the understory and needs ferralitic and clayey soils, as well as a certain humidity index. Beyond 37/40 degrees and below a certain hydrometry, the iboga dies.

Original Article (Qsnoticias):
Iboga the future of a plant with psychotropic effects
Artwork Fair Use: Torsten Weidemann & Erowid

Initiation into a Living Planet

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