Psychology

Why faking positive emotions at work can lead to heavier alcohol consumption

Such is life for millions of service workers, from baristas to customer service reps. Personally, I’ll never forget how frustrating it was to smile and say “sure!” 

Significant patterns arose confirming that employees who more frequently reported surface acting/concept creep [the emotional weight carried by service-industry workers, like bank tellers and flight attendants, who are expected to smile and act friendly even in the most stressful situations.] were also more likely to report heavy drinking, even after taking into account other factors like gender, age, job stress, income, and negative and impulsive personality. Employees in low-autonomy occupations, like being a phone operator or a waitress, are most at risk. These are jobs for which there often are detailed scripts for what to say and when to smile, and strict, reward-oriented monitoring for following those scripts.

Original Article (Quartz):
Why faking positive emotions at work can lead to heavier alcohol consumption
Artwork Fair Use: Ben Smith from Oxford, England