Biography/Memoir

Hidden network of kratom devotees tries to keep the supplement safe — and legal

“It was kratom, Ash said, that allowed her to escape the opioid epidemic. She ended up in rehab in 2011, and was weaned off her pain pills with Suboxone, a medication that itself contains opioids and can be addictive… [Another Mom] wrote… I need it so I’m not hurting, so I can be a good mother,” said Burton, a 31-year-old… mom of a toddler in southeastern Missouri.”

It was kratom, Ash said, that allowed her to escape the opioid epidemic. She ended up in rehab in 2011, and was weaned off her pain pills with Suboxone, a medication that itself contains opioids and can be addictive. So, after eight months, against her doctor’s orders, she weaned herself off Suboxone with kratom. “This is the plant that returned me to being a productive member of society again,” she said. So when she read this week’s news that the Drug Enforcement Administration will outlaw kratom for two years — putting it into the same legal category as heroin and LSD — she started sobbing. She could hardly talk as she woke her husband up to be consoled. It’s easy to dismiss kratom users as herbal remedy enthusiasts, intent on using psychoactive plants however they like. But the DEA’s decision has revealed, instead, a hidden nationwide network of advocates, educators, and devotees who talk about discovering kratom the way some Christians talk of being born again.

Original Article (Stat):
Hidden network of kratom devotees tries to keep the supplement safe – and legal
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