Biography/Memoir

…psychedelic patents

“…we will vigorously enforce our patents when it comes to commercial competitors,” said Christian Angermayer of Compass Pathways… on [synthetic psilocybin Polymorph A] Comp 360… [although] their IP is actually a lot narrower than it otherwise would have been had that challenge to the patent not have gone through… the Polymorph A patent for Compass is more narrow now… only covering that exact kind of x-ray powdered diffraction, the XRPD, of that crystallized psilocybin…

…Q: “Does Porta Sophia have a position on some of the patent claims and some of the shenanigans by psychedelic companies and individuals who make somewhat spurious and quite ambitious claims to patents?” …A: “Bad patents are bad for everyone… psychedelic prior art… Polymorph A is not a new compound… from analysis of historical examples that existed a long time ago the scientists and the paper showed this is not a novel invention… in terms of accessibility we know from a… 2017 I-MAK report called “Over-Patented, Over-Priced” that on average when a drug is patented price increased by 68% and some as high as around 160% in extreme cases so when a drug is over-patented it really could affect the price and that could prevent accessibility at a larger scale.” …Q: “And that’s why if there is that prior art and it’s not novel and it is being used or has been used for a long time that it should continue to be so without having to pay double to get it from the pharmacy.” Jack Griem, a lawyer for Freedom to Operate, argued that since the Patent Trial and Appeal Board defined Comp 360 so narrowly… “Compass is now on notice that its ‘Polymorph A’ patents cannot be asserted recklessly against any commercial-scale manufacturer or distributor of a psilocybin-based medicine… manufacturers of psilocybin now have a clear pathway for making sure that psilocybin they manufacture or sell is not at risk of infringing Compass’s ‘Polymorph A’ patents.” Echoing this argument, Carey Turnbull, founder and director of Freedom to Operate… “the [United States Patent and Trademark Office] PTAB’s [Patent Trial and Appeal Board] narrow interpretation of Compass’s patent claims will provide generic manufacturers of psilocybin with wide latitude to produce and commercialize psilocybin without risk of violating the Compass patents.”

Original Article (Psychedelic spotlight & Psychedelics today):
The battle for psychedelic patents & Compass pathways psilocybin patent & Porta sophia psychedelic prior art
Artwork Fair Use: ronardios