Biography/Memoir

Veterans have become unlikely lobbyists in push to legalize psychedelic drugs

The legalization campaign’s focus on vets as leading advocates is not without controversy. Carlos Plazola, co-founder of the advocacy group Decriminalize Nature, said he was disappointed by the movement’s overemphasis on the struggles of service members. He said a broader cross section of people of color should have their experiences heard.

“We understand the value of pushing patriotism and advancing the American flag to the front of the parade, if you will, but if we’re going to be successful we have to also talk about the traumas of Black, brown and Asian people and Indigenous communities,” he said… Mr. Gould said a traumatic brain injury caused by the many rocket launches he oversaw during three deployments in Afghanistan left him with uncontrolled spasms of anger and anxiety. Healthy romantic relationships, he said, were out of the question. “It defragged my brain in a way that allowed it to heal,” he said of… ayahuasca… adding that his new frame of mind made it possible for him to meet the woman who would later become his wife. “It definitely saved my life.”

Original Article (New York Times):
Veterans have become unlikely lobbyists in push to legalize psychedelic drugs
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